San Antonio Travel and living guide

San Antonio Visitors and residents alike enjoy the charm and culture of the Alamo City. Our warm people, enjoyable setting and cultural flair make for a wonderful place to visit as well as a comfortable place to live. These is no shortage of sights, attractions and things to do in San Antonio. Our city is home to numerous shopping and entertainment venues as well as some of the best restaurants and dining in the world.


Information San Antonio is a website dedicated to sharing this beautiful and historic city with visitors, from the point of view of locals. We live and work in San Antonio and can attest to its enjoyable atmosphere. From the Riverwalk and Alamo downtown to the rugged Hill Country, San Antonio Texas is truly a remarkable and unique city to be enjoyed by visitors and residents alike.

Spanish Missions of San Antonio


The history and culture of San Antonio is deep rooted in the Spanish Missions. Our heritage we have today began with the arrival of Spaniards. The Spanish Missions were set up as religious centers for the conversion of native Americans to Catholicism as well as teaching the natives to live as Spaniards. The missions were peaceful and successful until the hostile Apache and Comanche indian tribes began attacking the missions and their inhabitants. With military support lacking and disease increasing, the missions declined and were ultimately secularized. The historical San Antonio missions still stand today and are a direct link to San Antonio's historical roots.

Mission San Antonio de Valero - The Alamo

The Alamo

Undoubtedly the most famous of the San Antonio Missions which is also why it's the symbol of our city, the Alamo City. Originally named Mission San Antonio de Valero, the Alamo was itself a home to Spanish missionaries converting native indians to Catholicism. Perhaps the most famous battle in Texas history took place at the Alamo during the struggle for independence from Mexico. Visit this historical landmark and you will definitely Remember The Alamo. This is one of the missions but it also has its own page, The Alamo
Mission San Juan Capistrano

Mission San Juan Capistrano

Established in 1716, Mission San Juan Capistrano moved to San Antonio from east Texas and made its permanent home here in 1731. San Juan is off Mission Road just south of Ashley Road. Mission San Juan was a major agricultural supply center with produce farming which helped support the area Missions during the eighteenth century. San Juan Photo Gallery
Mission Espada

Mission Espada

This mission was formed in east Texas in 1690 and moved to San Antonio in 1731 along the San Antonio River and is the southernmost of all the San Antonio Missions. This historical Spanish mission is on Espada Rd just south of loop 410.
Espada Aqueduct

Espada Aqueduct

Located at the corner of Ashley Road and Espada Road, this acequia supplied the water for farming feeding other irrigation ditches. Water was supplied to the ditch by diverting from the San Antonio River at the Espada Dam. This Spanish marvel was built in 1740 and continues to supply water for area farms.
Espada Dam

Espada Dam

The Espada Dam was built in 1745. The dam diverts water out of the San Antonio River and into the aqueduct which is still in use today. The dam was one of seven built during the 18 century for the purpose of irrigating the Missions fields. The entrance to the park is across from Mission San Juan on Ashley Road.
Mission San Jose

Mission San Jose

Mission San Jose is an active parish and is the largest of all the San Antonio missions. It is home to the famous Rose Window and hosts weddings and celebrations for groups and individuals today. This enormous San Antonio mission is known as the "Queen of the Missions".
Mission Concepcion

Mission Concepcion

Mission Concepcion is the closest mission to downtown San Antonio. Located just south of highway 90 on the Mission Trail, Concepcion is the oldest unrestored stone church in all America. The stone quarry, source of the materials used to build the church is still visible today. Concepcion Photo Gallery

Back to top